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By Janet Vargas - Independent Natural Researcher 30+ Yrs

Honestly Folks, you should give yourself the chance to be better Informed. You like to be Informed about Some Things but Not RoundUp? I can tell you this: It may Spare You Health Issues OR Explain Some Health Issues. Maybe you should address Your Doubts with a Dose of Truth. You will say to yourself "Thank Goodness I Did"…………I'm trying to Help You and Your Family. Read On!

To start with, did you hear what Guardian wrote in an Article called
One Man's Suffering Exposed Monsanto's Secrets to the World? It reads:

It was a verdict heard around the world. In a stunning blow to one of the world’s largest seed and chemical companies, jurors in San Francisco have told Monsanto it must pay $289m in damages to a man dying of cancer which he claims was caused by exposure to its herbicides.…

EVERY SO OFTEN THERE IS SOMEONE WHO HAS A VISION TO TAKE ON PERSONALLY TO BE A CONSERVATIONIST TO PRESERVE SOMETHING, AND I THINK THIS SHOULD INTEREST MY OF YOU. ENJOY!

From Positive.News

Tom Brown has spent most of his retirement tracking down all-but-extinct Apple Varieties that once thrived throughout Appalachia, US.

There’s no such thing as a bad apple in Tom Brown’s book, only ones that have lost their way.

The 79-year-old, from Clemmons in the south-eastern US state of North Carolina, has spent the 20-odd years of his retirement tracking down all-but-extinct Apple Varieties that once thrived throughout Appalachia.

Coaxing them back from obscurity in his own Orchards, he is giving new life to Apple Heirlooms with the kind of evocative names you might find in a Tolkien novel: Brushy Mountain Limbertwig, Mule Face and Tucker’s Everbearing are just a few fruits of his considerable labour.

Tom Brown at the Brushy Mountain Festival

“One so-called expert said I should only be trying to find the really outstanding varieties,” he told Positive News.…

ABC Rural / By Cara Jeffery and David Claughton 2021

I WOULD LIKE TO SEE THIS ARTICLE FROM THE ABC 2 YRS AGO PRESERVED HERE ON OURS AUSTRALIA BECAUSE I DISCOVERED THIS COUPLE'S STORY ON THEIR WEBSITE A YEAR AGO AND BELIEVE IN WHAT THEY ARE DOING - GROWING THE ANCIENT GRAINS SPELT and KHORASAN, THAT ARE MUCH HEALTHIER THAN MODERN WHEAT, AND TASTY TOO. VERY NUTRITIOUS.

Riverina organic grain-grower Bettina Walker has gone back in time to secure the future of an ancient grain variety.

The southern New South Wales grower bartered her rye grain for some hard-to-come-by Khorasan wheat seed to grow on her farm at Barellan in Southern NSW.

Ancient grains are a rarity on Riverina farms, where modern varieties of wheat, canola and barley dominate paddocks.

This season Mrs Walker and her husband, Robert, were growing two ancient grain varieties — Khorasan wheat and spelt — alongside a mix of traditional rye, oats and modern wheat.…

A handful of companies own the patents on virtually every seed planted in the US. Now, a new crop of unowned seeds is bringing biodiversity back to farming.

When Jack Kloppenburg looks out over his sprawling vegetable garden in rural Wisconsin, he sees half a dozen arm-thick green-striped squash called Candystick Dessert Delicata, and a gaggle of bright yellow Goldini squash among the lush green. “These are so delicious!” he exclaims with all the enthusiasm only a lifelong gardener can muster. But what’s special about the vegetables is not just their taste: They have all been grown from open source seeds developed by Oregon farmer Carol Deppe, a Harvard-trained geneticist and board chair of the Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI).

Most people have heard of open source software, maybe also of open source beer (Free beer for all!) or open source pharmaceutical research. The principle is the same: Someone developed the seeds — for cowpeas, corn, rye and more — and now offers the resource for everybody to share. …

Modern Agriculture has done us no favors, with it's unnatural methods of Farming.
And bombardment of Chemicals - from NPK Fertilisers to Weedicides and Pesticides, which only become necessary when the Laws of Nature have been violated. Modern Agriculture works against Nature instead of with it. Big Monocrops are bad for the Soil and disruptive to our Ecosystem. believe it or not

This is not Old School Methods which rely on Crop Rotation, preserving Goodness in the Soil by planting different Crops alternately that complement each-other; allowing Crops to be plowed into the Soil after harvest, which
Enriches the Soil with Vital Nutrients instead of stripping it of it's own Nutrition.

YOU WILL DISCOVER IN THIS POST, IN TIMES GONE BY, THERE WAS A VAST ARRAY OF EDIBLE PLANTS
(much more variety) growing than we have available today. the absence of them has really restricted our food choices and also affected the Ecosystem.

ABC Rural / By Megan Hughes and Katrina Beavan 28 Jan 2023

Consumers can expect to see more lychees on supermarket shelves for longer this year as cooler and wetter conditions result in a later harvest than usual.

And despite a bumper crop being picked, prices have stayed steady, meaning the delay is also good news for growers such as Lush Lychees in central Queensland.

Lychee Berries Growing In Queensland Now!

Owners Krystal and Paul Caton have processed more than 120 tonnes of fruit since December at their 5,000 tree orchard, 30 kilometres north-west of Rockhampton.

"This year we've had the greatest season that we could have asked for in the last seven years of owning our orchard," Ms Caton said.

"This really expands our market having a number of varieties that have all produced really well this year."

About 280km south, near Bundaberg, Australian Lychees Association president Derek Foley's orchard had produced a record crop.…

The cows kept by small-scale farmers in Africa are notoriously unproductive. The average dairy cow, for example, produces about 540 litres of milk per lactation. By contrast, dairy cows in North America that belong to commercial or intensive farmers can produce up to 10,479 litres of milk per lactation.

Grass-Fed Is Always Better Than Grain-Fed
Brachiaria Is The Best For Dairy Farms

One of the main differences between the two animals lies in the quality of their feeds and forage. Simply put, the more nutritious cows’ diets are, the more and better quality milk they produce. And small-scale farms – of which there are about 33 million in Africa, contributing up to 70% of the continent’s food supply – usually cannot afford more nutritious feed.

Brachiaria – the genus name of Urochloa – consists of about 100 documented species of grass of which seven species used as fodder plants are of African origin.…

By Janet Vargas - Owner Of This Website

DID YOU KNOW THAT 75% OF FOOD WORLDWIDE IS LIMITED TO 12 PLANT CROPS (and 5 animal foods) AND THAT WESTERN COUNTRIES......... MORE INTERESTING FACTS IN THIS POST, PLUS WHICH FRUITS AND VEGGIES THE AFORE MENTIONED ARE AND SOME INSIGHTS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF ENCOURAGING BIODIVERSITY HERE IN AUSTRALIA. ON A LIGHTER NOTE, I WILL ALSO MENTION SOME IMPROVEMENTS WE'VE HAD IN OUR FOOD CULTURE IN RECENT DECADES AND RECENT TIMES, TO WHAT WE HAD YEARS AGO. I HOPE YOU READ THIS POST.

According to TheFutureMarket.Com  we only grow a small percentage of Plant Food Crops in Western Countries that does not allow for much Food Diversity in our Diet or our Health. As mentioned, they state that 75% of the World’s Food comes from 12 Plants (and 5 Animals).

In this order, the highest turnover of Plant Foods produced are 1. Sugar, 2.…

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ANYONE FOR MULBERRIES? COUNT ME IN! HAVE YOU EVER COMPARED THEM TO BLACKBERRIES? THEY REALLY ARE PACKED WITH TASTE AND THEY MAKE A DELICIOUS JUICE TOO. ASK YOUR SUPERMARKET OR SPECIALTY FRUIT & VEG STORE TO BUY SOME IN!

Mulberry Farmer Pioneers Growing Techniques To Revive Ancient Fruit's Popularity

Landline By Jessica Schremmer  14 Aug 2021

Peter Szabo's Innovative Mulberry Harvester

Viticulturist Peter Szabo invented his own mulberry farming model to machine harvest the fruit.

A South Australian farmer is pioneering new methods of growing an "almost forgotten" fruit, to bring mulberries to new generations to enjoy their unique flavours.

A viticulturist by trade, Peter Szabo started growing mulberries at his farm in Kingston on Murray in South Australia's Riverland region from a single backyard tree six years ago.

"All our investments were in vineyards and that posed a real problem when we had a downturn in the viticulture industry and to improve my risk we decided to diversify," Mr Szabo said.

Mulberries have become a forgotten fruit in Australia

After running into trouble selling fresh mulberries, which are prone to grey mould issues, have a short shelf life and a need for handpicking, he decided to invent his own farming model.…